My Blog

Posts for: July, 2021

By Transcendental, LLC
July 24, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: medicine  
WhytheOintmentYoureUsingCouldbeMakingYourFacialRashWorse

The red, scaly rash suddenly appearing on your face doesn’t cause you much physical discomfort, but it’s still embarrassing. And to make matters worse treating it as you would other skin ailments seems to make it worse.

Your ailment might be a particular skin condition known as peri-oral dermatitis. Although its overall occurrence is fairly low (1% or less of the population worldwide) it seems to be more prevalent in industrialized countries like the United States, predominantly among women ages 20-45.

Peri-oral dermatitis can appear on the skin as a rash of small red bumps, pimples or blisters. You usually don’t feel anything but some patients can have occasional stinging, itching or burning sensations. It’s often misidentified as other types of skin rashes, which can be an issue when it comes to treatment.

Steroid-based ointments that work well with other skin ailments could have the opposite effect with peri-oral dermatitis. If you’re using that kind of cream out of your medicine cabinet, your rash may look better initially because the steroid constricts the tiny blood vessels in the skin. But the reduction in redness won’t last as the steroid tends to suppress the skin’s natural healing capacity with continued use.

The best treatment for peri-oral dermatitis is to first stop using any topical steroid ointments, including other-the-counter hydrocortisone, and any other medications, lotions or creams on it. Instead, wash your skin with a mild soap. Although the rash may flare up initially, it should begin to subside after a few days.

A physician can further treat it with antibiotic lotions typically containing Clindamycin or Metronidazole, or a non-prescription, anti-itch lotion for a less severe case. For many this clears up the condition long-term, but there’s always the possibility of relapse. A repeat of this treatment is usually effective.

Tell your dentist if you have recurring bouts of a rash that match these descriptions. More than likely you’ll be referred to a dermatologist for treatment. With the right attention—and avoiding the wrong treatment ointment—you’ll be able to say goodbye to this annoying and embarrassing rash.

If you would like more information on peri-oral dermatitis, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Transcendental, LLC
July 14, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth pain  
DentalTreatmentDependsonWhatsReallyCausingYourToothPain

Not all toothaches are alike: Some are sharp and last only a second or two; others throb continuously. You might feel the pain in one tooth, or it could be more generalized.

Because there are as many causes as there are kinds of dental pain, you can expect a few questions on specifics when you come to us with a toothache. Understanding first what kind of pain you have will help us more accurately diagnose the cause and determine the type of treatment you need.

Here are a few examples of dental pain and what could be causing it.

Temperature sensitivity. People sometimes experience a sudden jolt of pain when they eat or drink something cold or hot. If it only lasts for a moment or two, this could mean you have a small area of tooth decay, a loose filling, or an exposed root surface due to gum recession. If the pain lingers, though, you may have internal decay or the nerve tissue within the tooth has died. If so, you may require a root canal treatment.

Sharp pain when chewing. Problems like decay, a loose filling or a cracked tooth could cause pain when you bite down. We may be able to solve the problem with a filling (or repair an older one), or you may need more extensive treatment like a root canal. In any event, if you notice this as a recurring problem, don't wait on seeing us—the condition could worsen.

Dull pain near the jaw and sinuses. Because both the jaws and sinuses share the same nerve network, it's often hard to tell where the pain or pressure originates—it could be either. You may first want to see us or an endodontist to rule out tooth decay or another dental problem. If your teeth are healthy, your next step may be a visit with a physician to examine your sinuses.

As you can see, tooth pain can be a sign of a number of problems, both big and small. That's why it's important to see us as soon as possible for an examination and diagnosis. The sooner we can treat whatever is causing the pain, the sooner your discomfort will end.

If you would like more information on treating dental pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don't Wait!


By Transcendental, LLC
July 04, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
ThisFourthofJulyDeclareYourFreedomFromDentalDisease

Every Fourth of July, we Americans celebrate the day we declared ourselves an independent nation. Amid the fireworks and cookouts, it's also a time for renewing our commitment to live freely and pursue our own path of happiness. This Independence Day, why not add another pledge for you and your family: freedom from dental disease.

Alas, too many Americans are under the tyranny of tooth decay or gum disease, the two dental diseases most responsible for teeth and gum damage. Ninety percent of all adults experience some form of tooth decay by age 40. And half of the population will have had at least one gum infection by age 30, swelling then to 70% by age 65.

Both diseases also have the same worst case scenario: tooth loss, something that could impact your overall health and nutrition, your appearance and certainly your wallet. But neither of these harmful conditions has to happen—you and your family can be free of dental disease by consistently following these guidelines.

Brush and floss daily. The root cause for all dental disease is a thin film of bacteria and food particles on tooth surfaces called dental plaque. But removing daily plaque buildup by brushing and flossing drastically reduces your disease risk. A daily oral hygiene routine is the single best thing you can do to avoid dental disease.

See your dentist regularly. Twice-a-year dental visits further enhance your chances of healthy teeth and gums. Dental cleanings remove plaque and tartar (hardened plaque) you may have missed. It's also more likely your dentist will detect dental disease in its earliest stages, which leads to early treatment that minimizes long-term damage.

Eat a tooth-friendly diet. The foods you eat can affect your dental health, for good and for ill. Diets heavy in refined sugar and other processed foods are a veritable feast for harmful oral bacteria. On the other hand, whole, unprocessed foods and dairy are rich in vital nutrients and minerals that strengthen your teeth and gums against disease.

Don't smoke. Tobacco harms your health, including your teeth and gums. Nicotine, the active ingredient in tobacco, constricts blood vessels in the mouth, which in turn lowers the nutrients and antibodies available to your teeth and gums to stay healthy and fight infection. As a result, smokers are several times more likely to develop dental disease than non-smokers.

Whether Thomas Jefferson said it or not, there's a lot of truth in the saying, "Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty." Similarly, good dental habits require a life-time commitment—but following them can keep you free from harmful dental disease.

If you would like more information on reducing your risk for dental disease, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”